in English

El-Reis: Co-curated exhibitions

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 25/11 2021 Kl. 18.00

Lokale: KUA1 15a.0.13

El-Reis: Co-curated exhibitions as means of connecting to heritage, v. Wesam Mohamed, PhD-studerende Aarhus Universitet
Since the 19th century and until today, Egyptian local workmen proved to be very central to the success of all archaeological work, inside both sites and museums.

However, their work has been unrecognized for a long time and their history was kept in the shadow of other big names. El-Reis, is a co-curated exhibition which was recently organized in Luxor to introduce the Egyptian workmen as mediator between archaeology and the locals, to foster community engagement with archaeology, and to promote ownership and inclusiveness. More than 500 images were displayed at the exhibition, in addition to a variety of personal possessions. Most of which were brought to us by the workmen.

The exhibition focused on the use of exhibitions as ‘laboratories’ to locate and refine best practice in community engagement, with the aim of facilitating sustainable protection of heritage into the future. It gives understanding to multiple perspectives through the participation of the workmen, and the debates around identity, post-colonialism, the protection of antiquities, as well as contributing theoretical understanding of the value of heritage.

This talk will discuss means of community engagement to heritage through the work of the local workmen in archaeology, and how one exhibition could provide a rich platform of invaluable discussions.

El-Reis: Co-curated exhibitions

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 2/12 2021 kl. 17.20 – døren låses!

Antikmuseet på Aarhus Universitet,
Victor Albecksvej, Århus C, bygning 1414

El-Reis: Co-curated exhibitions as means of connecting to heritage, v. Wesam Mohamed, PhD-studerende Aarhus Universitet
Since the 19th century and until today, Egyptian local workmen proved to be very central to the success of all archaeological work, inside both sites and museums.

However, their work has been unrecognized for a long time and their history was kept in the shadow of other big names. El-Reis, is a co-curated exhibition which was recently organized in Luxor to introduce the Egyptian workmen as mediator between archaeology and the locals, to foster community engagement with archaeology, and to promote ownership and inclusiveness. More than 500 images were displayed at the exhibition, in addition to a variety of personal possessions. Most of which were brought to us by the workmen.

The exhibition focused on the use of exhibitions as ‘laboratories’ to locate and refine best practice in community engagement, with the aim of facilitating sustainable protection of heritage into the future. It gives understanding to multiple perspectives through the participation of the workmen, and the debates around identity, post-colonialism, the protection of antiquities, as well as contributing theoretical understanding of the value of heritage.

This talk will discuss means of community engagement to heritage through the work of the local workmen in archaeology, and how one exhibition could provide a rich platform of invaluable discussions.

– – – – – – – efterår 2021 – – – – – – –

Lørdagsseminar om Bes

Bes. Glyptoteket ÆIN 220 (foto: Anders Sune Berg)

Mødedato: Lørdag d. 25/9 2021 kl. 11-16
Lokale: KUA1 22.0.11

11.00 – Foredrag 1, v. Lise Manniche, mag art., PhD
12.15 – Frokost (medbring selv mad og drikke)
13.00 – Foredrag 2 v. Olaf Kaper, Professor of Egyptology, Leiden University
14.15 – Pause
14.45 – Foredrag 3, v. Christian E. Loeben, August Kestner Museum Hannover

I forbindelse med BES-udstillingen på Glyptoteket (30/4-31/10 2021) vil lørdagsseminaret handle om Bes. Udstillingen er blevet til i samarbejde med Allard Pierson Museet i Amsterdam og August Kestner Museet i Hannover.

I Amsterdam var Olaf Kaper gæstekurator for udstillingen, og i Hannover, hvor udstillingen rejser til efter København, er Christian E. Loeben kurator. Det er således disse to, der sammen med Lise vil fortælle den lille, grimme, kære dæmongud Bes.

Lyden af Bes v. mag.art., PhD. Lise Manniche

I de senere år er der kommet fokus på “lyde” i det gamle Ægypten, ikke bare klangen af musikinstrumenter, men lyd generelt. Dette særlige fagområde kaldes nu for “arkæoakustik” eller “soundscapes” (modsat “landscapes”). Efter at have beskæftiget mig med Bes’ udseende, hans betydning for fertilitet og fødsler, og i et vist omfang med hans musikinstrumenter er det derfor nærliggende at præsentere “Lyden af Bes” i en lidt bredere sammenhæng og med særlig fokus på hans stemme, og hvordan han brugte den.

The small gods of Ancient Egypt: examining Bes and Tutu v. Olaf Kaper, Professor of Egyptology, Leiden University

The gods of the ancient Egyptians were very many indeed, and the gods were grouped together in many different ways. Bes belongs to a class of gods that we may call “small gods”, with the use of an ancient Egyptian term. This lecture will discuss the place of Bes in the pantheon and compare him to the god Tutu, with whom Bes is sometimes depicted together.

By looking at the role of the small gods, we can understand better how the Egyptians saw their world and how they dealt with the overwhelming amount of divine beings that could help or threaten them.

Bes and Thoeris, two “small gods” in Ancient Egypt: same competence – different careers v. Christian Loeben, Museum August Kestner, Hannover

It is a remarkable phenomenon: The goddess Thoeris, Egyptian Ta-Weret (“The-Great-One”), has enjoyed adoration for the longest time in Egyptian history. However, Bes who really became Bes only as late as in Dynasty 26 (c. 600 B.C.E.) would very quickly supersede the venerable goddess as the most popular deity in the realm of Egyptian private life.

The lecture will analyse the mechanisms behind it and will finally show that the career of Bes in the later phases of Egyptian religion was not only an extraordinary one but was also exceedingly diverse.

Professional weavers and their looms in Roman Egypt

Romersk tunika

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 14/10 2021, kl. 19.00
Lokale: KUA1 22.0.11

Professional weavers and their looms in Roman Egypt, v. Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert, Post-Doc. Research Fellow, Centre for Textile Research (CTR), Københavns Universitet

In addition to agriculture, textile production was one of the most important branches of the Egyptian economy from the Pharaonic era to the medieval Arab period. The question of the different types of looms and the specialised weavers is one of the most crucial issues for understanding the evolution of textile production and its technological development in the Nile Valley.

This presentation is an attempt to re-interpret some of the evidence, mainly papyrological and iconographic, which could add new data to the study of professional weavers and their looms in Egypt in the Roman period.

This research is conducted in the framework of the group ‘Egyptian weaving Tools and Looms’ of twelve experts coming from various horizons: archaeology, experimental archaeology, textile analysis, ethnographic research and Greek papyrology The goal of the project is to write a collective article on tools and looms in Egypt from the Ptolemaic to the early Arab period.

The group has been created in 2020 to continue our collective research started in 2017 with the workshop Egyptian Textiles and their Production: ‘Word’ and ‘Object’ (for the publication, see: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/egyptextiles/), organised as part of the MONTEX project under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no MSCA 701479, hosted by Saxo-Institute: CTR.

Revisiting the treatment of the viscera: from organs to the Sons of Horus

Figures of the Four Sons of Horus found in the abdominal cavity of Nesenaset. Mud and wax. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 25.3.156a–d.

Figures of the Four Sons of Horus found in the abdominal cavity of Nesenaset. Mud and wax. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 25.3.156a–d.

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 18/2 2021 kl. 18.00
Lokale: KUA1 15A.0.13

Revisiting the treatment of the viscera: from organs to the Sons of Horus, v. Solène Klein, PhD student, Oriental Studies (Egyptology), University of Oxford

As part of the wider process of mummification, the removal and treatment of the viscera is traditionally regarded as a necessary step towards the preservation of the body.

This has been the dominant understanding for the last 150 years, despite being less supported by sources than we might imagine. In fact, it has not been the focus of detailed empirical research, being instead perpetuated as an overall explanatory framework—a framework that devalues the nuances and importance of viscera-related practices in the embalming ritual.

This paper offers a reassessment of existing conceptual and material perspectives and examines the role of viscera-related practices in transforming the human body into divine body and in protecting the newly created divine entity.

A number of new insights into evisceration and viscera-related practices are discussed. Firstly, that they are transformative and protective processes – where the internal organs are transformed into the Sons of Horus and where protection is enabled through their material representation.

Secondly, that there are no fundamental changes in practices, despite material differences observed in the canopic equipment, as the Sons of Hours remain a constant through their representation in burial context, across different sites.

Building textile archaeology in the Nile Valley

Elsa Yavanez

Cotton textiles from Qasr Ibrim (©Trustees of the British Museum) and textile tools from El-Hassa and Meinarti (Sudan National Museum). (Photos: Elsa Yvanez)

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 25/3 2021 kl. 19.00
via zoom. Link er sendt på nyhedsmail til medlemmerne.

Skriv til elin@daes.dk hvis du er medlem – og ikke har modtaget linket.

Building textile archaeology in the Nile Valley, v. PhD Elsa Yvanez, PostDoc, Marie Sklodowska-Curie fellow, Tekstilcentret, Københavns Universitet

Hundreds of years of excavations along the Nile Valley have yielded great amounts of ancient textiles from Egypt and Sudan, well preserved thanks to the arid climate. Settlement sites have shown textile fragments, archaeobotanical remains, fibres, and threads, as well as many implements used for textile manufacturing; but it is from graves that most of the material comes from.

The complex funerary rites of ancient Egypt and Sudan made great use of textile material, for wrapping human and animal remains, for offerings and for furnishing the tombs. From settlements to cemeteries, from iconography to textual sources, textiles were everywhere in the economy and society of the ancient Nile Valley.

Their omnipresence and important social role are often implied in scholarly literature, but this formidable textile material is still not studied and published to its full potential. Inspired by the current renewal of textile research in academia, new research projects are now emerging, advocating for a more inclusive and multi-disciplinary approach.

This lecture will propose a model to build textile archaeology in the Nile Valley, using material from Meroitic Sudan as a case-study (TexMeroe, Marie Skłodowska-Curie project 743420). It will then present new perspectives currently opening in the domain of Pharaonic textiles.

Lørdagsseminar om Bes

Bes. Glyptoteket ÆIN 220 (foto: Anders Sune Berg)

Mødedato: Lørdag d. 29/5 2021 kl. 14 via zoom

På grund af rejserestriktioner er de to udenlandske foredragsholdere desværre forhindret i at deltage. Men Lise holder sit foredrag via zoom kl. 14. Link fremsendes senere på nyhedsmailen. 

I forbindelse med BES-udstillingen på Glyptoteket (åbner 20. maj) vil lørdagsseminaret handle om Bes. Udstillingen er blevet til i samarbejde med Allard Pierson Museet i Amsterdam og August Kestner Museet i Hannover.

Bes på kanten v. Lise Manniche

Bes har en vigtig rolle at spille ikke blot som en lille ”husgud” for almindelige ægyptere, men også som statist i den officielle religion som den afspejler sig i arkitekturen.

I dette foredrag fokuserer Lise på tre forskellige tidspunkter i historien, hvor store Bes-figurer optræder i særlige rum i templer, der blev rejst i Ægyptens yderområder (Sakkara, Bahariya og Gebel Barkal).

 

The Treasury of Thutmosis I at Karnak

Arbejdet med fragmenter i Karnak Nord

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 26/9 2019 kl 19.00
Lokale: KUA1 23.0.49

The Treasury of Thutmosis I at Karnak: Finds in the storerooms, v. Ass. Prof. Dr. Irmgard Hein, Wien

The treasury of Thutmosis I is located within the wider area of Karnak North and was investigated by IFAO (Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale) under Jean Jacquet 1970-1978.

Kalkstensfragment fra Thutmosis Is Skatkammer

Kalkstensfragment fra Thutmosis Is Skatkammer

Materials and some groups of finds have been already published in six volumes by the excavator and his wife Helen Jacquet-Gordon, working on site until 2010. The find material from the area covers a large timespan, from the early Middle Kingdom, until the Ptolemaic and Roman era. A large part of the finds was left in the storerooms, which were built on site in Karnak North.

This material became the subject of a new study at the request of the Egyptian authorities. Under the umbrella of the IFAO the University of Vienna is working since 2013 in yearly campaigns to remove all find material from the site, in order to save and to protect the objects. The process is demanding because of new activities on site, however, it offers an opportunity to check the inventories, to provide digital photographic records and finally to study some hitherto unpublished material, before all objects are stored again in new massive facilities.

The variety of finds includes ceramics, small objects, or the very fine worked limestone relief fragments, that were once part of the decoration in the treasury of Thutmosis I, and which were cleaned and saved during the last two years. Not all finds are published, and so we now have the unique chance to complete the records for the hitherto unregistered and unpublished finds.

Cf. Homepage IFAO: https://www.ifao.egnet.net/recherche/archeologie/karnak-nord/

 

Lost in Time & Space

Paul Dominique Philippoteaux 1891

Mødedato: Onsdag d. 30/10 2019 kl 19.00
Lokale: KUA1 23.0.49

Lost in Time & Space: unrolling Egypt’s ancient dead, v. John J. Johnston, The Egypt Exploration Society, London

A frequent souvenir of wealthy travelers, the mummified cadavers of ancient Egyptians were not confined merely to museums but became an increasingly popular feature of salons and lecture theatres throughout London and, indeed, the Western world during the mid-nineteenth century.

The practice of publicly ‘unrolling’ mummies has been viewed as both a ghoulish spectacle for affluent sensation seekers and as an early scientific approach to the emerging discipline of Egyptology. This lecture places the practice within its social, cultural, and historical contexts.

John ruller en næsten ‘rigtig’ mumie ud på Glyptoteket dagen efter foredraget, 31/10. Foredraget giver en mere detaljeret baggrund for dette og kan ses som en appetitvækker.

 

Tales from Egypt

WesamMødedato: Torsdag d. 14/3 2019, kl. 17.20 – døren låses!

Antikmuseet på Aarhus Universitet,
Victor Albecksvej, Århus C, bygning 1414

Understanding ‘real-life’ Heritage issues: Tales from Egypt, v. Wesam Mohamed, PhD Fellow Aarhus University

The high significance of Egypt’s cultural heritage has widely influenced the academic fields since centuries. However, stories beyond the formal research might shed light on more crucial contexts.

This talk discusses critical ideas about Egyptian antiquities and their value using real-life examples. It presents different patterns of conceptions and behaviours concerning heritage; aiming to offer an in-depth view from inside the issues of value, ownership and identity.

Tales from Egypt

WesamMødedato: Torsdag d. 11/4 2019 kl 18
Lokale: KUA 15A.0.13

Understanding ‘real-life’ Heritage issues: Tales from Egypt, v. Wesam Mohamed, PhD Fellow Aarhus University

The high significance of Egypt’s cultural heritage has widely influenced the academic fields since centuries. However, stories beyond the formal research might shed light on more crucial contexts.

This talk discusses critical ideas about Egyptian antiquities and their value using real-life examples. It presents different patterns of conceptions and behaviours concerning heritage; aiming to offer an in-depth view from inside the issues of value, ownership and identity.

Excavations in museums stores

Hermann Junker i Turah 1910

Hermann Junker i Turah 1910

Mødedato: Torsdag d. 25/4 2019 kl 19
Lokale: KUA1 23.0.49

Excavations in museums stores – Updating the cemetery of Turah, v. Dr. Vera Müller, OREA – Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna

At the time when Hermann Junker excavated the cemetery of Turah in 1910 it was very easy to receive permission to export excavated objects from Egypt, especially if they were not considered as unique or precious. The latter was especially true for the items from Turah, as they consist in their majority of pottery vessels and some stone vessels, whereas personal articles such as jewellery, cosmetic object or tools were rare.

Junker was nevertheless very happy about this disinterest, as the period from the late Predynastic and Early Dynastic Periods (end of 4th – beginning of 3rd mill. BC) were not yet represented in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Ever since its publication in 1912, the cemetery of Turah has been considered as one of the key sites of this period.

After more than a hundred years, the publication needs, however, an update based on modern methods. What Junker did not anticipate, was a similar disinterest of his colleagues in Austrian and some other museums, which means that nowadays a lot of effort has to be undertaken to even identify the material in the museum’s stores.

Hjemmeside (tysk): https://www.khm.at/en/learn/research/projects-and-results/aegyptisch-orientalische-sammlung/der-friedhof-von-turah/ 

 

Seminar – Tutankhamon

Trompet med trækerne fra Tutankhamons grav

Trompet med trækerne fra Tutankhamons grav

Tutankhamon i krig og fred

Mødedato: Lørdag d. 15/9, 2018, kl. 11-16
Lokale: 23.0.49

Foredrag 1 kl. 11-12.15:

Trompeter i det gamle Ægypten, v. Lise Manniche, mag. art., PhD

I Ægypten var trompeten ikke et musikinstrument, men et signalinstrument, og dermed hører den også hjemme blandt stridsvogne og andre krigseffekter.

trompet-holdes

Lise vil gennem billederne præsentere trompetens historie i landet og ved hjælp at det unikke fund af to trompeter i Tutankhamons grav diskutere dels trompeternes klangmuligheder, dels deres historie gennem de seneste næsten 100 år.

Kl. 12.15 Frokostpause (medbring selv mad og drikke)

Foredrag 2 kl. 13.00-14.15:

Double compound bow, decorated with bark, object card (Griffith Institute)

Double compound bow, decorated with bark, object card (Griffith Institute)

Bull’s Eye! Bows from the Tomb of Tutankhamun, v. André J. Veldmeijer Visiting Research Scholar, American University in Cairo

A variety of weapons and related equipment was found in the tomb of Tutankhamun, such as bows and arrows (and their accompanying wrist-guards, quivers and bow-cases), chariots, throwing sticks, clubs and daggers. Bows in particular feature prominently. This talk presents the results of an initial study of some of the bows coming from Tutankhamun’s tomb, with a discussion about their manufacture and suggestions for comparison and further study.

Pause kl. 14.15-14.45

Foredrag 3 kl. 14.45-16.00:

Tutankhamon

Tutankhamon

“Hans Majestæt kommer til syne på sin stridsvogn ligesom Re” – Stridsvogne i Tutankhamons grav, v. Ole Herslund, PhD

I det Ny Rige blev stridsvogne en integreret del af det faraoniske kongedømme. Fundet af hele seks stridsvogne og tilhørerende udstyr i Tutankhamons grav kaster lys over Farao som kriger og feltherre. I samspil med andre kilder diskuteres stridsvognens forskellige roller på slagmarken og dens indvirkning på militæret, kongens aktiviteter, ikonografi og ideologi.

 

Khufu’s harbour and papyri on the Red Sea

Mødedato: Tirsdag d. 20/11 2018, kl. 19.00
Lokale: KUA 21.0.54

Khufu’s harbour and papyri on the Red Sea: excavations at Wadi el-Jarf, v. Pierre Tallet, Professor of Egyptology – Sorbonne University, Paris

The Wadi el-Jarf site, excavated since 2011 by a team of the Paris-Sorbonne University, is a harbour on the Red Sea shore that was used at the beginning of the 4th dynasty to reach the copper and turquoise mines of the south-western part of Sinai Peninsula.

During the 2013 archaeological campaign, hundreds of fragments of papyrus from the end of Khufu’s reign were collected at the entrance of one of the storage galleries that are one of the most remarkable features of the site. This is, from now on, the oldest papyrus archive ever found in Egypt. This material was produced by a team of sailors which is already well known for its work on the harbour, and it mainly includes two categories of documents: accounts of commodities delivered to the workers, and logbooks recording their daily activities over several months.

Most surprisingly those last documents, for what is preserved of them, do not report to the activity of this group on the Wadi el-Jarf site. They describe previous missions led under the direction of the « inspector Merer », mainly devoted to the transport of limestone blocks from the quarries of Tura to the Great Pyramid of Khufu at Giza, then under construction on the opposite bank of the Nile.